What Enhances Wellbeing in Daily Life?

Teleios recently analyzed 63 peer-reviewed articles in the medical literature that evaluated wellbeing as related to 4 Bible-based terms1:

wellbeing01

These characteristics in a person’s life improve wellbeing!

They also demonstrated a positive influence on specific societal issues
including improvement in social relationships, delinquent behavior and physical health.

wellbeing02

These parameters were generally derived from only 2 sources:

wellbeing03

Studies showed that 3 of these parameters (except hope) could be taught to some extent in a secular setting.
However, all 4 characteristics (including hope) were shown to be improved by religious involvement.

Note: For this study almost all of the included articles meeting inclusion criteria were from Christian countries.

wellbeing04



Importantly, ‘hope’ may be defined differently between secular and spiritual spheres. Temporal hope: “…an expectation about attaining a desired goal in the future …”2 generally thought of as a goal to achieve on earth during a person’s life. Christian hope: “a confident expectation of salvation gained through faith in Jesus Christ’s sacrifice on the cross for mankind’s sin”3 that is, directed to a heavenly target.

How these characteristics were helped in these studies4 was not clear, but perhaps could be produced from:

wellbeing05

wellbeing06

This study suggests that forgiveness, gratitude, hope and empathy may improve general wellbeing, pro-social, and positive relational behavior, and demonstrate positive health effects.

For a copy of this infographic for your own use please click here.

References
1. Stewart WC, Reynolds KE, Jones LJ, Stewart JA, Nelson LA. The source and impact of specific parameters that enhance well-being in daily life. J Rel Health 2015; in press.
2. Farran CJ, Popovich JM. Hope: A relevant concept for geriatric psychiatry. Arch Psychiatr Nurs 1990;4:124–130.
3. Ryrie CC. Basic theology. Chicago, IL: Moody Publishers, 1999.
4. Hong IW, Ow R. Hope among terminally ill patients in Singapore: An exploratory study. Soc Work Health Care 2007;45:85–106.